Mosaicking the Universe

If you read the last blog postyou know that I ended with something about ‘mosaicking the universe.’  I suppose that’s a figure of speech, but we could at least make a good dent in covering bare spots in Austin, Texas with stories and meaning constructed from bits and pieces.

have two volunteers besides myself who are ready and willing to help those two women get their own church mosaic project started.  Anyone else in?

Here is our own mosaic progress, as of 11:45 Wednesday morning:

Detail of a mosaic wall mural being made by University Presbyterian Church in Austin, Texas

Doing a sanity-check on the crafting of the latest figure.

Keep in mind that the larger tiles are ¼-inch square and the smaller tiles are ⅛-inch square!

Detail of Panel 2, work-in-progress of a wall mosaic, The Feeding of the Five Thousand, being made by University Presbyterian Church in Austin, Texas

Checking the placement of Chase, the dog, in the crowd scene.

We take lots of snapshots as we go, in order to check our work from a distance, and to be more objective about what is happening on the panel.

Detail of Jesus and the boat from the large wall mosaic, The Feeding of the Five Thousand, being made by University Presbyterian Church in Austin, Texas

Looking at the yellow grout on the canoe seats.

The blue tape marking off the edges of Jesus’ shirt is only temporary- it keeps grout from settling where it’s unwanted.  These yellow canoe seats were taped the same way before grouting.

Detail of grouting progress on Panel 2 of the large wall mosaic, The Feeding of the Five Thousand, being made by University Presbyterian Church in Austin, Texas

Checking out the grout-in-progress on Jesus’ red shirt.

You can compare all these similar photos to see how many tiles (tesserae) appear white because of light reflections.  If nothing else, mosaic is about the effects of light!

Detail of Panel 2 crowd scene on the mosaic wall mural, The Feeding of the Five Thousand, being made by University Presbyterian Church in Austin, Texas

Checking the progress on the woman and man on the right and the yellow-shirted girl on the left.

After working and re-working various faces and bodies, the mosaic artists start feeling like they know these characters.  Perhaps this is how a novelist feels about her characters?

This panel is the part of the story in which Jesus has rowed (paddled?) to the other side of the lake to find a quiet place to pray.  HA!  There were apparently about a gazillion people waiting there for him on the shore.  Do you think he was surprised?

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